How Do You Do Primavera?

Somewhere, somehow, someway along the road, Pasta Primavera became any kind of pasta mixed with any kind of vegetables. But before this happened, pasta primavera was synonymous with the season it’s named after: Spring.   I’m sure that, way back when, an Italian farmer threw together some spaghetti, fava beans and artichokes on a cool April evening, topped it with Pecorino and, voila, a timeless dish was born.

Today, to see pasta primavera on a menu could mean anything at all: bowtie pasta with carrots, peas and corn, perhaps.  Or fettuccine with sausage, tomatoes and spinach.  You find it in spring, summer, winter and fall.  Primavera has become a staple.  Not that there’s anything wrong with that; even I’m guilty of the faux pas: my “primavera” is spaghetti with roasted peppers, cherry tomatoes, zucchini and lemon.

Well, at least The Restaurant is doing it right.  Included on the new spring menu is Fettuccine Verdura: locally farmed vegetables (aka, seasonal springtime veggies) in an herbed white wine butter sauce with parmesan shavings.  Can you just imagine what this tastes like with a glass of Vermentino?!  And, in case you didn’t yet know, The Restaurant is now open for dinner on Friday and Saturday evenings until 8 pm.  Make your reservation and try Fettuccine Verdura or one of the Chef’s many other newly inspired dishes.  See the menus here.

I like my pepper and zucchini primavera with Fume Blanc.  How do you do Primavera and what do you like to drink with it?


Posted by , April 27, 2012 No comments

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