A New Favorite Thing: Olive Oil Mayonnaise

Maria Von Trapp was really onto something when she sang, “…when I’m feeling sad, I simply remember my favorite things and then I don’t feel so bad.”

It was a particularly dreary, rainy, cold day here in the Northeast.  To top it off, my husband had just left for an out-of-state, five-week schooling program as part of his job.  To say the least, I was feeling a little sad.  And so, taking a cue from Maria, I brewed myself a cup of tea and sat down with a pile of some of my favorite things: my cookbooks.  If I would be cooking for one (well, one and a half, counting my 17 month old) for over a month, I was going to cook well.  I started with my copy of “Olive Oil: From Tree to Table,” a beautiful cookbook I had purchased during my first year working at Ponte.  Of all the scrumptious-sounding recipes I was glancing through, like Oil-Cured Fish and Provencal Garlic Soup, I found myself intrigued with a recipe for Mayonnaise.  Thinking back, I can recall why: I’d already decided to use up the last of my bacon by making BLT’s for lunch.  Also, the day before,  I noticed my jar of mayonnaise eerily separating.  There were pools of something – egg?  oil? –floating on top.  Eww.  Basically, I was out of mayo and what is a BLT without lots of it? A homemade recipe would be perfect, and also new.  This is something I’d never attempted before.  I also loved the fact that all of the ingredients are staples in most modern kitchens, eliminating a trip to the market.  In addition, if you have a blender or food processor, this recipe is ready in mere minutes.  If all you have is a bowl and a whisk, it will take a little bit longer, but it can be done…and will probably taste even better knowing that you’ve hand-whisked a homemade mayonnaise!

In my food processor, I blended some Dijon mustard, an egg, a bit of salt and pepper, Ponte Arbequina Extra Virgin Olive Oil (another one of my favorite things) and some vinegar.  What resulted was a thick, creamy, pale yellow concoction of deliciousness.  Truly, it was scrumptious and tasted nothing like store-bought mayonnaise, although I have never tried the newer olive oil versions from the store.  I was very generous with it on my BLT.  I couldn’t help myself.   To drink, I had a glass of 2009 Barbera which was fruit-forward and wonderful with the smoky bacon.

Dare I say that I’ll never buy mayonnaise again?  Who knows?  But I will definitely be trying this recipe with lots of variations like using canola oil for a milder mayo, and toying around with different flavored vinegars.  This version made with olive oil would be a delicious dip for crudités or a dip for steamed artichokes.  The “Olive Oil: From Tree to Table” cookbook also has recipe variations for garlic aioli, remoulade, green herb mayo and spiced orange mayonnaise.  I highly recommend it, especially to anyone who is an olive oil-junkie, like me.

You can purchase Ponte’s Arbequina Extra Virgin Olive Oil in the Marketplace and in the online store here.

Mayonnaise

Adapted from Olive Oil: From Tree to Table by Peggy Knickerbocker

  • 2 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 egg
  • Pinch of salt
  • Dash of pepper
  • 1 cup extra virgin olive oil, such as Ponte Arbequina
  • 2 Tbsp white vinegar

In a food processor or blender combine the mustard, egg, salt and pepper and pulse until blended and smooth.  With the motor running, add the olive oil in a slow, steady stream.  Process until the mixture starts to thicken.  Stop when all of the oil has been added and scrape down the sides.  Add the vinegar a bit at a time and combine.   Refrigerate and use within 5 days.

Alternately, make the mayonnaise by hand.  In a bowl, whisk the mustard, egg, salt and pepper until smooth.  Add the olive oil, a drop at a time at first until it starts to emulsify, then in a very slow, steady stream.  Whisk until thick.  Then, add the vinegar a little at a time, whisking until combined.

–What are some of your favorite things?


Posted by , January 18, 2013 No comments

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